Crazy Dave’s Bar Schedule

Posted by Florida Underground Wrestling News and Information on August 3, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

CRAZY DAVE’S SPECIAL EVENTS

To sign up for any of our events, please call the bar at: (727) 531-5518. We are always looking for pool players for our leagues. Also, we need players for our upcoming Dart League and local bands who would be interested in playing live at Crazy Dave’s.

AND JOIN US EVERY TUESDAY @ GASOLINE ALLEY FOR
LIVE PRO WRESTLING SHOWS. CLICK HERE FOR INFO.

CRAZY DAVE’S ONGOING EVENTS

MONDAYS: IN-HOUSE POOL LEAGUE
Tables open for practice at 7 PM. Competition starts at 8 PM. $5 to play. 6 teams of 3 people, with all skill levels welcome. Ball in hand rules, playing 3 games each night. All money goes back to the players, even the last place team. The league lasts 15 weeks, culminating in a big party at the end of the season, with free food and a double-elimination pool tournament.

TUESDAYS: IN-HOUSE BOWLING LEAGUE
Competition starts at 6:30 PM. $5 to play, and all money goes back to the bowlers. And don’t forget out drink special — buy 3 drinks, get 1 free — limit 1 per person please.

WEDNESDAYS: BEER PONG
Starting August 3, 2011, beer pong tournaments. For more information, please call the bar at: (727) 531-5518.

WEDNESDAYS: TRAVELING POOL LEAGUE
Coming soon — new Wednesday Night Pool League OR Wednesday Tournament Night. Interested parties, please call the bar at: (727) 531-5518 or email us at cubanworldwide@aol.com

THURSDAYS: IN-HOUSE POOL LEAGUE
See “Mondays” listing above for full information.

FRIDAYS: LIVE MUSIC
Join us on Fridays, 9 PM – Midnight, for live music from Jill, singing everything from oldies to modern hits and more.

SATURDAYS: KARAOKE WITH WENDY & AL
Be the star of the show. Come on down, and bring your friends, every Saturday night, 8 PM – Close.

SUNDAYS: FREE POOL
Plus Happy Hour prices from open to close.

SIGN UP INFORMATION:
To sign up for any of our events, please call the bar at: (727) 531-5518. We are always looking for pool players, as well as players for our new Dart League and local bands interested in playing live at Crazy Dave’s.

Pro Wrestling: Heroes of Wrestling Past: Gangrel

Posted by Joe Wrestling on June 27, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

Years ago, before vampires went to high school and sparkled, the Draculas of the world used to wrestle.  Isn’t that a fun fact?!  Of course you know who I am referring to Gangrel.  Yeah the chubby guy, with the puffy shirt, who use to spit blood everywhere.  By request of a reader of the previous edition, I decided to take a look back at David Heath, better known as Gangrel, as our next Hero of Wrestling Past.

First of all, if you didn’t like the vampire gimmick, it was a Vince Russo thing (that explains a lot).  I would also like to say that his entrance was pretty sweet.  The arena would get dark, with a red tinge, this eerie music would play and he rose from fire.  How BA is that?  Gangrel first made his debut on August 16, 1998 on Sunday Night Heat (back when people actually watched Sunday Night Heat).  He defeated Scott Taylor. (AKA Scotty Too Hotty.  Don’t worry I’ll get to him in a future edition.)  Gangrel would be the Goldberg of WWE, going undefeated for several months.  

Soon, he joined forces with a couple of guys named Edge and Christian.  Keep in mind, these two guys never did anything else (except some titles and stuff that nobody remembers….nobody.  If you say they became two of the best performers in WWE history, then you just ruined the joke.) in their careers and rode Gangrel’s Hall of Fame coattails.  These three men formed The Brood.  The Brood was known to use the Freebird Rule in tag team matches and to give opponents blood baths.  Most wrestlers would change there clothes after being covered in blood, except Al Snow…gross.

Gangrel would have his faction join The Ministry of Darkness, aligning himself with The Undertaker.  Gangrel would also set his sights on coveted European gold.  He would not capture it, but it showed he had what it took to be a champion.  The Brood began to crumble.  Gangrel would leave those Edge and Christian guys for the paragons of virtue that are known as The Hardy Boyz (turns on tazer).  The New Brood would be a dominate force, until it disbanded because for some reason The Hard(l)y Boyz were more interested in Terri Runnels.  

Following this break up, Gangrel worked alone until he brought in his real life wife, Luna Vachon.  She was soon fired and he was back on his own.  Apparently, Gangrel was drinking too much blood and was fired for weight issues.  He would attempt to come back on numerous occasions, but he just couldn’t cut down on the carbs, so he never made it back to the main roster,  However, Gangrel did return for the Raw 15th Anniversary show in the gimmick battle royal.  

Gangrel has worked for independent promotions all over the world.  Finally, he decided to follow in the footsteps of the perfectly sane Chyna and enter into the world of adult films.  He became a part of the New Porn Order (I am hoping Scott Hall sat this one out).  He was known as Vampire Warrior.  In 2007 he made his adult film debut in Miami Pump Shakerz 2.  That is disappointing, because sequels are never as good as the originals.  

Oh, how the mighty have fallen.  Thanks for reading!  Please feel free to comment on your fondest memories of Gangrel and also with who you would like to see featured on future editions of Heroes of Wrestling Past.  Be sure to check out the SPECIAL CvC 2.0 EDITION of Heroes of Wrestling Past, coming this Friday!  Thanks again for reading!

Article source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/749654-pro-wrestling-heroes-of-wrestling-past-gangrel

Bob Mould on His New Memoir, Falling Out With Hüsker Dü, and Pro Wrestling

Posted by Joe Wrestling on June 25, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article


Bob Mould on His New Memoir, Falling Out With Hsker D, and Pro Wrestling

Photo: Steven Dewall/Redferns

The front man for the eighties’ Minneapolis-based hardcore band Hüsker Dü, Bob Mould made meaningful, noisy music out of a very punk spirit of “despair meets resignation.” The band ended in 1987, and Mould went on to have more success with Sugar in the early nineties, and remains on the festival circuit today. More recently he’s also become a D.J. who throws an itinerant party called Blowoff that appeals to unabashedly manly gay men — bears. He’s just released a memoir, called See a Little Light, which he wrote with journalist Michael Azerrad (Little, Brown Co., $24.99). In addition to being a detailed document of punk going mainstream, the book is an unsparing self-examination. Carl Swanson spoke with Mould for a New York Magazine feature, but here is the largely unedited transcript of their wide-ranging conversation.

You’ve always been so protective of your privacy. And yet you’re here writing about your ex-boyfriends, drug use, being molested, your parents — everything.
It’s a liberating feeling.

It is?
I think so, yeah.

You even go back and explain how you think what happened to you in life was reflected in your music. A lot of musicians won’t do that.
Yeah. Songs are sort of ethereal. You can sit down and try to write a song, and sometimes it’s good and sometimes it’s not, and a lot of times the inspiration hits you when you least expect it, and you’re not really sure, in the moment, what provokes it. It’s sort of a strange concept. But going back, you can sort of see what the meanings were, what the situations were. A lot of them are composites; it’s not always, “this is what happened from when I woke up at breakfast to when I left the house in a huff.” It’s not that simple. Copper Blue is a very optimistic record. You know, things were good in my personal life; professionally, I had sort of taken the reins back from a confusing situation with Virgin and outside management. So that was sort of empowering, which I guess is happy.

You also have this sort of diary, a journal of where you are artistically and what you were feeling at that time. Was that helpful in writing the book? Did you go back and listen to the whole catalogue?
No, I know the songs pretty well [laughs]. I was loath to get into specific meanings of songs. They pressed really hard for me to do that.

Michael Azerrad or the publisher, Little, Brown?
Both Brown and Azerrad. He was just like, “You can’t write a book and not deconstruct some of the songs.” But I was loath to do it because why should my literal meaning of a song — why describe it to people? It takes away. When people hear songs, it’s a visceral moment. When you hear things like that, they resonate, and get into your molecular structure, and become part of who you are, and make you think different ways. For me to go back, several years later, and tell somebody, “This song was about firing my whole team because we lost a kickball” — you know? To them, that’s their wedding song, and it’s like, all of sudden… I think the greater picture is showing people what my life was like at the time, because that’s more the overall feeling of who I am and what I do and whether those things intersect. I mean, I’m pretty self aware. There are spots in the book that speak to one of my idiosyncrasies: worrying myself to death with what people must think.

It’s like you feel a certain sense of responsibility to the fans.
Well I’m a huge fan of music, and I know what it means to people, and I know what it means to me, and I project what music means to me onto others, through my own work, and I come up with these scenarios, like when Hüsker Dü went from SST to Warner Bros., and I was so worried about what people would think about it. I write this incredibly abrasive song that has to be the opening, so people don’t get the wrong idea that we lead with a pop song. Writing a whole apology letter to rock and roll, that speaks so clearly to my …

Anxiety?
Yeah. It’s a terrible idiosyncrasy, hard to get rid of. And you know that comes from — well, it’s all set up in the book. I’m not sure where everyone gets their hyper-vigilance. To me it’s very clear.

You mean with your family being so abusive?
That just seemed like the norm. And I knew nothing different. I saw it in other families around me, and that just what it was: Men drink and have frustrations and take it out on their spouses and that’s just how the world works. And you learn that, and when I got to 25, I got to cut off. It’s a battle. That’s what life is about. It’s a battle to try to get to the next place, and leave behind the parts that don’t work.

There’s a great sense of that self-knowledge in the book. You don’t have that mooning over your past career. You could be that person. It’s good that you’re not.
I’m very quick to toot my own horn; I’m also equally as quick to recognize unrealized projects, or things that didn’t go as well as I thought they would. If you don’t get wrapped up in your own bullshit, you can see where you sort of slipped, and why you slipped.

It’s a very pragmatic perspective. What did you listen to growing up?
I had such a rich knowledge of music, and it was those jukebox singles — I still have half of them. When in doubt, I could just put something on and it’ll put me back on track. If you can get all the jukebox singles from the sixties and have them as your foundation for music, it’s pretty damn strong. The melodies and range, and harmonies — the idea of singing along with records and being able to harmonize. I’ve taken that over the course of my career of being able to harmonize really well with people on the spot, just improvising. Melody’s important. It’s good to have a song that people whistle as they walk down the street. It resonates.

The Hüsker Dü song “Everything Falls Apart” always pops into my head.
It was really one of the early songs of that sort of despair-meets-resignation, with a really catchy melody.

And the voice down low in the mix.
It makes the music seem louder!

Have you stopped burying the words?
It depends on the song. Now that I’m older, the music isn’t quite as frenetic as it used to be, and I want the stories to be more out front. Also, as I’ve gotten more comfortable with my voice. You know, I never really liked my voice, so it’s nice to bury it a little as well. But now that I have a little more control over the words and I’m more comfortable with my actual voice, I push it up a little more. It depends on the actual song. If I want the message to be clear, then the vocals will go pretty far up. If it’s punk rock, then the vocals will go back. That’s the aesthetic.

How did you and Azerrad work on this book together?
We’d Skype. We had the voice on, no video, and the chat window open. We’d just copy parts back and forth. I’d have a manuscript, a couple of other windows open. I’d have, like, four windows open, and I’d just copy and paste. I’d be able to have mine, then put his revisions, and then revise. He was telling me, when he’s worked on books before and he’s the editor, a lot of times, people will write side-by-side towards the end, in the editing process.

What else did he push you on?
The personal stuff. Sometimes I would mention a story and he would connect the dots, and just suggest that I take a harder look about what I just said, and suggest I spend some time with it.

It’s a very literal, as-it-happened type of feeling.
I’m trying to tell the story in the moment. I think it’s the story at the end of the Hüsker run when I was in England, and [former Hüsker bassist] Greg Norton shows up with this contract, and he was probably very benign and just showed up, but I was so out of my mind, so the perception was that he was this crazy person who had worked with this lawyer to extract a bunch of money from me. To me, it was like this AHH. I’m just trying to show people how out of my head I was. It’s not flattering to me. [Laughs]

It’s not. It’s very self-critical. You don’t always tell people how you’re feeling.
To me, sort of how it worked with Hüsker Dü, it was such a natural fit, for the most part, ‘til the end. There was nothing that needed to be said; we just went about our business, and I thought, “So that’s how we do with musicians.” With sugar, I got very specific about how I wanted things to do, and it was successful. I got beat up a little being for being a control freak.

You stopped drinking at 25, you write to avoid becoming your abusive alcoholic father. Was it also your being a control freak?
In a business that encouraged bad behavior— and it worked to the benefit of the record companies to keep the artists in that state of mind; they don’t want anybody stopping and thinking about things — it’s like suspended adolescence that goes on indefinitely, until all of a sudden you don’t have a career and you’re thrust into the adult world with no skill set. It’s frightening, and a lot of people get depressed and kill themselves. Did you see The Wrestler? A great movie that tied it all together. It resonated with me on a lot of different levels. The main character was sort of over-the-hill and lost his way and didn’t have anything else he could do. And there’s one part in the movie where’s working at the deli counter in a Safeway and he got so frustrated and people would come up and say, “Weren’t you that guy?” And he wanted attention just like the wrestlers do, he just stuck his hand in the meat grinder and started bleeding. He cannot even cope with the fact that he is not a celebrity anymore, but in a moment of panic or doubt he reverts back to mutilating himself, because that’s what he did his whole life.

Speaking of which, I loved the part where you go to work for WCW professional wrestling.
I tried to write a book inside a book. When you get all the way to it, it’s just one or two little mentions, and then you hit that part and it’s like “rockstar gay and all” and then just boom, I reset and start talking about when I was a kid again and this other life that was really important to me and nobody really asked me about before.

When you think about it, pro-wrestling is pretty gay, isn’t it?
It’s homoerotic. And I think they know it, and they don’t want to acknowledge it too much.

They’re tapping into something that is an outlet for a lot of men. Which isn’t to say all men are gay.
Up until about five years ago, they catered to all sectors. They tried to get teenage kids, because they’re looking for superheroes, really impressionable, looking for good versus evil. But now, in the last five years, pro-wrestling exposed that it was choreographed, just a show. So now you’ve got Ultimate Fighting Champion, where the old wrestling fans from 18 to 55 went to that, because it’s the same thing, but it’s real.

That’s homoerotic. It’s just not as silly. It’s upsetting, but it’s more real.
Guys just push themselves to the limits every day of their lives. It’s a crazy world. I couldn’t believe I got the call to come in and help.

Were you coming to relate to the crowd? Were you coming it to that perspective?
I was just so overwhelmed of sitting in the War Room, with these guys I grew up watching on TV, and shaping this product that five million people watch every week. I came in with the utmost respect for the business, a knowledge of the business — as a fan, I understood the mechanics of it. With 20 years of travel, I was able to keep up with the pace. A lot of people can’t. They saw that right away, and they were, “You can run with us, you can run fast, let’s go!” I also brought good grammar, good punctuation, good handwriting.

In terms of the story stuff you brought —
A lot of it was trying to keep continuity. They brought in a couple writers from New York who were ADD, who were so scattered that they couldn’t remember what they’d done from week to week. We’d write the stories on Wednesday and Thursday at the meetings, and I would say, “We did this two weeks ago.” Or there would be things that were sort of homophobic or racist, and I would say, “Do you really want to have the Mexican guy hit the Japanese guy over the head with a tequila bottle?” And somebody would be like, “Are you calling me a racist?” And I’d say, “No, but the idea is a little funny.” I became the naysayer with a certain group, and with another group, they were counting on me to be the naysayer. It was a little crazy.

When I went to see professional wrestling once at Madison Square Garden, all the stories and characters and back stories — it seemed like a form of soap opera for men.
It’s like Shakespeare, the 16 stories. You stole my wife, you stole my belt, you ruined my car, you ruined my life. You have to position people in a certain way and if you’re gonna tell the story over a long course of time, you have to somehow screw this guy until the very end, when good finally triumphs. You have to drag people through that story, and pace it. And that is becoming a lost art form. It’s become now these guys who do a 14-minute soliloquy to set up all these stories, and they think they’re Hollywood guys. It’s not like some of the eccentric characters who go out there and improvise off of three bullet points, which is what it should be. There should never be someone writing lines for guys to go out and say. That’s not the essence of it. It was a crazy time. I was fortunate to have my time there and see how it worked and make some big decision and got caught up in a lot of politics and walked away.

Did your steroids use end when you left?
I was still doing stuff — some OTC stuff, to keep you strong and big. Not like Annadrol, that’s sort of a hardcore steroid. I wasn’t using a lot. I can’t do them any more. My testosterone levels are too high naturally. Last time I asked a doctor about the possibility, and he said there’s absolutely no way. There’s breast cancer in your family history, your testosterone levels are already too high. You cannot do them. I was like, “Ok.”

You seem like a solidly built guy.
The last five pounds would be nice to lose, but I can’t shake it.

But you seem like to actually eat.
Food is important. I eat six times a day. I eat all day. I work out every day. I don’t do cardio or any of that, I just go and lift. The steroids are a big part of the gay culture, that’s for sure. A lot of the drugs I put into my system eventually put into my system became part of the gay culture; like speed became this Big Gay Drug. It sort of came out of the SoCal gym culture, and then became part of the gay, body-specific ideal.

You seem almost invisible to gay culture.
The beauty of invisibility is that you gain a much wider palette for observation. If nobody’s looking at you, you can look at everything. Then there are times where you’re the focal point, so there are all these different perspectives that I sort of walked through. With sexuality and identification — in the book I explain my ignorance of gay culture. I’m an uncomfortable spokesperson because I blurt, and I’m not always politically correct. And the gay community, more so than other communities, are very quick to reparse your thoughts, and if a couple words come out askew, they will tear you apart, so I don’t step up much. Also, I didn’t embrace the more flamboyant side of gay culture — the effeminate, the drag, the transgender — since I didn’t identify or understand it, when I would see the conservative media in the 80s covering ACT UP, who were doing all the heavy lifting. I just didn’t appreciate it at the time. They weren’t lifting for me, they were lifting for people with AIDS, and I just didn’t get it. That is one of my two enormous laments about my sexuality. The other is, if I’d be out in ‘86, what things would be like.

And yet, in 1994, you came out in Spin, but that didn’t go well. You seem to have regretted it.
I didn’t feel like it was contextualized. I was like, “For hanging out all that time, you took that one and ran with it.” Now I laugh about it. I mean, it was good for business, it made for a memorable moment.

Are you worried about how your estranged Hüsker Dü bandmates will feel about the book? You’re not always easy on Grant Hart, the drummer.
No. Nothing I can do about that. I think I was pretty fair.

Even the people you don’t like, you say, “This is what’s good about this person.” There’s nothing particularly score settling.
I worked out a lot of the anger before the copy edit. When I got to the bottom of it, I think I’m at a pretty even spot with it. Grant’s story was “I quit the band, Bob’s a tyrant, fuck this whole thing, I was held back.” And I was reading that and I was thinking, “That’s not my story.” But I will wait, and I will focus on my music, and I will let this go. But it continued, and it continued, and it continued. And I was just surprised: Why am I all of a sudden a dartboard? I never publicly made my thoughts known about how the band wrapped up. It’s not my story to tell, so it was sort of frustrating that people would always come to me with pieces of information, ways to bury Grant. It should be so clear in the book what the deal is. For eight years of my life, that was my life. That’s all I cared about. I had a partner, and that was important too, but it always took the backseat to the band, and I was trying everything I could to make that work for everybody. If somebody’s going to call me a prick, it will be a self-fulfilling prophecy. If that’s the person you want, that’s the person you’ll get. You may be one of the only three people that feels that way about me, but if that’s the person you want, I will be that way for you. But Hüsker Dü was third on the list of things to worry about. The two things that weighed most heavily were my family and my long relationship with Kevin. I lost months of sleep over those two. With Kevin, it was very clear. I was very insecure in the relationship, there were things missing in the relationship that he needed.

Well, you did have several fairly long relationships.
My first relationship with Mike Covington was giddy. We were both in our twenties and it just blew up, and that was fine. With Kevin there was an incredible investment, on all sides. When it started to weave together professionally, then we became embedded in it. We were joined at the hip.

He probably thought he had to do that to be a part of your life…
He was able, as well. It wasn’t like he was a traditional partner in the wings questioning the manager. He was right in their taking my thoughts and setting them properly. Walking away from Kevin, the reason why it was civil, is because I clearly still have a lot of feelings for him. The temptation to try to barter and hold on longer — I couldn’t even look back. [Laughs] The temptations always there to try to fix it again.

You seem to have a pretty good circle of friends today.
Yeah, we just hang out, we’re just regular guys, and we all just love music and good food. That’s what ties us together. It’s pretty amazing.

What about your family? Are your parents still alive?
Yeah. They live in central Florida. I got them settled in down there. They’ve been there for 15 years. They’re getting up there in age. Still alive, still together. That’s their life. That’s their dynamic, not mine. They’ve always been incredibly supportive, incredibly proud of my work. My mom is one of my biggest fans, and I think my dad is, too. Not only did he give me all that turmoil, but he gave me music. And now I see those fit together.

Do you think you are like him?
Yeah. We’re all like our parents in some way. A combination of both parents, sometimes more than the other. I’ve spoke to my dad about his father, and he told me things that happened in his life with his parents; different things that hit him, that spun around and they’re the same when they hit me. And you can’t put blame, and say, “I hate my parents for what they did.” No, they’re your parents. You love your parents and you take what you get, and you learn from them and you learn to let go of the parts that aren’t valid for you.

You said you were going to start going to the Catholic Church in D.C.
Yeah, I went back to church.

I couldn’t tell that much about your actual religious upbringing from the book, other thing whether or not you should go to parochial school.
I went on Wednesdays. It was an exchange program with the public school.

My religious background was semi-fundamentalist / protestant. Jesus was not on the cross. There was no blood.
There’s a lot of blood in the Catholic Church. It’s the principal. There’s community and giving and caring and the structure of these rules and guidelines, but the image is someone who suffered greatly. And when you get that as a child, that’s part of what you know and what you learn and you study it. You go to CCD and you get this fourth name and all these things—they give you the name and hit you on the head and you’re gone, and then you’re on your own with it, left with all that stuff you learn. And the abusive privilege that the Catholic Church is famous for, that violation of trust — that’s a complicated reveal. With religion, I get all that stuff in me, and in a moment of uncertainty, I go back and reexamine it and spend a number of years in the church trying to find a place to connect. I love it, it’s like the set list — it doesn’t change. You go in, they give you this, they give you that, they get to the sermon. It’s this ritual you learn, and it’s natural, and it’s comfortable. And again, those three levels of the church, and why I’ve stepped back from it again, is because the top level is so nonsensical and nonhuman right now. They haven’t accepted the fact that they’ve lost control of imagery. For centuries, they were the curators of art and culture and progress. They controlled that you had to go to them to see those images and hear those stories, and they then lost control of that over the last 100 years to Hollywood and now the Internet. They haven’t adapted with modern times. The previous pope, yes, because he was so of the people, but the new one is so [smacks his hands] he’s just trying to protect these archaic ideas and protect what’s left of the riches.

And the way they handled the abuse — and you have your own story…
I brought that in at the moment of discovery, as opposed to the beginning which would have made me a victim for the whole book. The thing of the church is that, on the top, you have the people who are trying to protect the real estate, and in the middle you have the people who actually have to maintain it on a day-to-day basis, and built a constituency to support it, and then underneath, you have the believers, who go there because they care and they’re wonderful people. And the fact that society now beats up people on the bottom because of the abuse at the top — it’s frustrating to me, as a cafeteria catholic.

You had the description early on about forcing people to understand something … your attitude to being onstage has changed.
We were provocative. It wasn’t scorched earth as much as really trying to stay away from the more dogmatic parts of our movement, trying to stay away from the blind politics and moving more towards the personal. So many people jumped in on that “fuck the government, fuck Reagan” — and rightfully so — but as we moved beyond that rudimentary anarchistic idea, the bigger story becomes what do you do in your community, what do you do in your relationships, what do you do in your life?

Article source: http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment/2011/06/bob_mould.html

Al Snow Talks TNA, Wrestling’s Popularity, More

Posted by Joe Wrestling on June 23, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

This week, Pro Wrestling Illustrated contributing writer Brady Hicks, plus DJ and Anthony Sarlo, are joined IN THE ROOM by a very special guest: former WWE and ECW star AL SNOW! Take it all in as the former WWE star (and current TNA agent) plugs his upcoming Mondo Wrestling A Go Go show at the Danny Davis Arena in Louisville, Kentucky, 6/24 and 6/25. Plus, check out Al’s thoughts on WWE and TNA renaming their product, what wrestling needs to be big once again, and how the developmental system could be and should be fixed. A must listen for fans of any wrestling promotion! Check it out at thebradyhicks.com.

For a direct link to the show click here.

How TNA is Positioned For the Future:
I can tell you this … I have been impressed with just how hard everybody seems to work there. It’s just impressive. From the talent down, everybody really busts their hump and really puts in the time and the effort and the passion when it comes to those TV shows and pay-per-views … Sitting in those meetings, nobody ever says “Let’s just do this.” Everything is agonized over. Every single person works really hard, I couldn’t single one out.

On WWE and Impact Wrestling’s Recent Name Changes:
WWE taking it out? I don’t care. They can call it whatever they want. They can call it farming. At the end of the day, it’s professional wrestling. That’s what they’re selling. Tell me one completely brand new thing that is now fake that is different or unique from TNA, from Mexico, from All Japan Pro Wrestling, from New Japan Pro Wrestling, wherever.

The Difference Between Setting Up Independent Shows and Doing Similar Work for TNA:
How is [anything] different than TNA? Not really. Different perspectives or ideas, different talent, and that’s a BIG thing … Wrestling as a whole is and should always be entertainment. The reclassification that it’s no longer wrestling and that it’s entertainment is really just an attempt to say they reinvented the wheel and made something different. But I was there for 13, 14 years … and when the pyro stops, the music ended, and the bell rings, I’m really curious about what is done different in the one place than in the other.

Why Wrestling Has Become Less Popular:
Everybody has played other sports growing up. You connect to it. That’s why hockey has got a bigger following in Canada, more people have played it. That’s why soccer is more popular in the rest of the world, everybody has played it. That’s why it’s going to continue to grow in the US, more kids play it. That’s why more men like sports than women. What happens with wrestling is that people are attracted to the characters and to the personalities. The only thing that has changed between 1911 and 2011 is that the crowd has gotten more sophisticated.

On His Mondo Wrestling A Go Go Show:
It’s an adult circus, that’s the best way to describe it. It’s a combination of burlesque, aerial acts, circus acts, fire dancers … drag queens, drag KINGS – the lesbian equivalent of women that dress up as men – …, got a guy who has a fire whip … very intriguing, and then wrestling matches, the way I can best describe it is very old-ECW-like where the referees are just there to count the fall.

All that, plus Al Snow compares wrestling to the UFC, his thoughts on Tough Enough (and compared to The Ultimate Fighter), Brock Lesnar, the future of Impact Wrestling as it continues to grow, and recreating territories.

Also on the site: Brady’s thoughts on Austin Aries on Impact, and Ratboy’s undefeated prediction streak continues with WWE Capitol Punishment. Weekly Show Schedule:

Monday – Wrasslin’ Roundup with The Wrestling Press’ Matt Roberts
Tuesday – IN THE ROOM
Wednesday – Minding The Business with “Dr. Wrestling” Rich Jones
Thursday – VOC Wrestling Nation (formerly 1Wrestling Radio)
Friday – What’s Wrong With Wrestling with Harry Barnett
Saturday – Completely Damaged TV
Saturday – Saturday Night Akbaz with Mr. Akbaz
Sunday – WrestleDope Radio LIVE
Sunday – Carny Knowledge with Matt “Doink” Borne

Thanks for supporting the IN THE ROOM podcast on thebradyhicks.com. To leave a message for the show, you can e-mail us at intheroompodcast@gmail.com or call (206) 337-1031. And while you’re at the site, be sure to check out great interviews with AJ Styles (8/9/10), Kurt Angle (10/8/10), Sunny (3/21/11), Don West (12/13/10), Serena Deeb (11/8/10), Madison Rayne (6/8/10), and Kevin Thorn (10/25/10).

Brady Hicks has been writing about wrestling for more than 15 years, for Web sites, newspapers, and magazines. He is a contributing writer for Pro Wrestling Illustrated and is also the host of his acclaimed weekly podcast – IN THE ROOM.


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Article source: http://www.tnastars.com/2011/06/22/al-snow-talks-tna-wrestlings-popularity-more/

Al Snow Talks TNA Wrestling’s Future, Wrestling’s Popularity, WWE

Posted by Joe Wrestling on June 22, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

Former WWE ECW star and current TNA Wrestling agent was recently interviewed by Brady Hick, DJ, and Anthony Sarlo of Pro Wrestling Illustrated’s In the Room. Below are a few highlights of the interview:

How TNA is Positioned For the Future: I can tell you this … I have been impressed with just how hard everybody seems to work there. It’s just impressive. From the talent down, everybody really busts their hump and really puts in the time and the effort and the passion when it comes to those TV shows and pay-per-views … Sitting in those meetings, nobody ever says “Let’s just do this.” Everything is agonized over. Every single person works really hard, I couldn’t single one out.

On WWE and Impact Wrestling’s Recent Name Changes: WWE taking it out? I don’t care. They can call it whatever they want. They can call it farming. At the end of the day, it’s professional wrestling. That’s what they’re selling. Tell me one completely brand new thing that is now fake that is different or unique from TNA, from Mexico, from All Japan Pro Wrestling, from New Japan Pro Wrestling, wherever.

The Difference Between Setting Up Independent Shows and Doing Similar Work for TNA: How is [anything] different than TNA? Not really. Different perspectives or ideas, different talent, and that’s a BIG thing … Wrestling as a whole is and should always be entertainment. The reclassification that it’s no longer wrestling and that it’s entertainment is really just an attempt to say they reinvented the wheel and made something different. But I was there for 13, 14 years … and when the pyro stops, the music ended, and the bell rings, I’m really curious about what is done different in the one place than in the other.

Why Wrestling Has Become Less Popular: Everybody has played other sports growing up. You connect to it. That’s why hockey has got a bigger following in Canada, more people have played it. That’s why soccer is more popular in the rest of the world, everybody has played it. That’s why it’s going to continue to grow in the US, more kids play it. That’s why more men like sports than women. What happens with wrestling is that people are attracted to the characters and to the personalities. The only thing that has changed between 1911 and 2011 is that the crowd has gotten more sophisticated.

On His Mondo Wrestling A Go Go Show: It’s an adult circus, that’s the best way to describe it. It’s a combination of burlesque, aerial acts, circus acts, fire dancers … drag queens, drag KINGS – the lesbian equivalent of women that dress up as men – …, got a guy who has a fire whip … very intriguing, and then wrestling matches, the way I can best describe it is very old-ECW-like where the referees are just there to count the fall.

Article source: http://wrestleheat.com/al-snow-talks-tna-wrestlings-future-wrestlings-popularity-wwe=8268

SmackDown Redux (June 17th, 2011): Two Minutes of Wrestling Is Better Than A …

Posted by Kari on June 18, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

Yes… I went there.

I think it’s fair to say that this week’s episode of Monday Night Raw was nothing more than a big ole mess. Fourteen divas, one ring, and no time is never a good combination but when things end up with a chorus line or a kick line, or whatever the hell you want to call it, it’s just not good for anyone involved. I can only thank the wrestling gods high in squared circle heaven for sparing at least seven of the girls the utter humiliation of just looking dumb. As far as the other seven… well, at least three of them got a chance to redeem themselves on SmackDown. The war between the heels and the faces continued on this Friday and we finally got our six Diva tag team match. Natalya joined her rookie pals, AJ and Kaitlyn, to take on Tamina, Alicia Fox, and Rosa Mendes. Will the heels reign supreme or will the faces carrying their kick line momentum to another victory?

Like usual, we kick things off with the entrances and rather than just letting us see the face entrance, we get the heel entrance this week as well. Alicia, Tamina, and Rosa come out to Alicia’s music and they stand in the ring with their bitch faces on while the faces make their way to the ring. I also thank the wrestling gods for not letting me hear AJ’s theme again, and if all she ever does is tag with and use Natalya’s music from here on out… I’m okay with that. Anyway, the faces pose for the crowd and it’s decided that Alicia and Kaitlyn will begin.

Alicia attacks right off the bat by kicking Kaitlyn in the stomach and knocking her down with a stiff looking forearm. She tosses her in the corner and looks to bounce her head off the turnbuckle, but Kaitlyn gets a foot up to block. Kaitlyn fires back with an elbow, as well some other offense, and she throws Alicia into the corner padding. Alicia stumbles away from Kaitlyn and groggily turns around only to be knocked down with a clothesline. She wisely gets up, runs to her corner, and tags in Tamina.

Tamina and Kaitlyn lock up, with Tamina easily getting the advantage here. She sends Kaitlyn flying into the corner and the NXT season three winner smartly tags in Natalya. The gorgeous blond enters the ring and slides between Tamina’s legs. The surprised Diva whirls around and Nattie nails her with a dropkick. Tamina goes stumbling into the ropes and Nattie goes to use the adjacent ones for leverage. Rosa inserts herself into the action by getting Natalya’s attention, and that allows Tamina to recover. When Natalya turns around, Tamina slams her foot into the Canadian’s gut, and Nattie is doubled over in pain. Tamina follows it up with a vicious little headbutt and Nattie is sent to the ground. This gives the beautiful brunette a chance to work over those powerful legs of Natalya’s and she decides to try and weaken the left one.

And when I say left, I could mean right. I’m ambidextrous so I don’t really know the difference.

Anyway, Tamina snaps Natalya’s knee (not literally) but it proves to be a mistake because the experience of Nattie pays dividends. Natalya is able to turn Tamina’s wannabe submission into the Sharpshooter and she pulls the lesser experienced Diva to the center of the ring. She’s looking for a victory but Rosa jumps in the ring and attacks Nattie from behind. This brings in Kaitlyn, who is quick to dispose of Zack Ryder’s ex-girlfriend (still a travesty he was left off Raw this week, ahem). Nattie scrambles to her corner and AJ finally gets to see some action.

The little spitfire comes flying in with some pretty snazzy forearm shots to Tamina’s face. However, the larger, more powerful girl is able to shove AJ off. AJ bounces off the ropes and attempts to wrap herself around Tamina’s shoulders, but Tamina puts a stop to whatever it is that AJ is wanting to do. She simply falls back and crushes AJ, and she goes for the cover.

One…

Two…

Three!

Alicia, Tamina, and Rosa are able to celebrate a victory.

Welp, it wasn’t bad.

That said, it wasn’t good either. I want to reserve extreme judgment because some people are saying this match was horribly edited. Apparently there were digitals that showed different things happening in the match that was shown on television. I can’t confirm that because honestly, I don’t have a clue. All I can talk about is what I saw in three short minutes. A good minute of the match was used simply for ring entrances and the rest was action. Alicia and Kaitlyn worked well together and wow, Alicia just looked so pretty to me tonight. Tamina worked the majority of the match and against Natalya, she was solid. I would honestly like to see a one on one match between those two because I feel as if Natalya could bring out Tamina’s best. They could match power for power moves, and it could be a great contest.

Not really sure what else I can say about this week’s SmackDown. It went how pretty much how I thought it would. I don’t know if we can ever expect the girls to improve when they’re given so little time but all we can do is continue to support them no matter what. One day someone will wake up and realize that there are amazing wrestlers on the Diva roster and they’ll give those girls a chance to shine and make the girls who lack look like a million dollars. Look what happened when time was invested in Layla.

That’s basically all I’ve got this week, I’m afraid. It doesn’t look like we’ll have anything to watch at Capitol Punishment unless something is added at the last minute. I’ll be watching regardless but should we not have any Diva action on Sunday, I’ll just hope that we get something great come Monday.

Of course with a three-hour show, that probably won’t happen. Until then… Cryssi out!

Tags AJ Alicia Fox Diva Dirt TV Kaitlyn Natalya Rosa Mendes Tamina

Article source: http://www.diva-dirt.com/2011/06/18/smackdown-redux-june-17th-2011-two-minutes-of-wrestling-is-better-than-a-chorus-line/

(WWE) Randy Orton Injury Update, Internal Discussion on WWE Stock, Slater/Gabriel – TWNP

Posted by Ivan Zhukoff on June 16, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

Headline Posted by Marc Middleton on 09:02:48 AM Jun 15, 2011

- The drop in WWE stock lately has been a major topic of discussion within WWE. Some expect that there will be lots of cost-cutting coming soon but at the same time, WWE will continue their normal work load, even adding more work, just doing it with less employees.

- The tag team of Justin Gabriel and Heath Slater will debut new theme music on this Friday’s SmackDown now that The Corre is no more.

- Randy Orton suffered a legitimate concussion at a WWE live event in Madrid, Spain this past Sunday, which is where WWE got the then-apparent angle on Monday night. They are still working with the idea that Orton will perform at Sunday’s Capitol Punishment pay-per-view.

Huge Change to Capitol Punishment?, Revealing New Diva *LOCKER ROOM* Pics and Lots More!

Partial source: F4Wonline.com

Article source: http://www.twnpnews.com/messages2/34195.php

(WWE) Randy Orton Injury Update, Internal Discussion on WWE Stock, Slater/Gabriel – TWNP

Posted by Ivan Zhukoff on under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

Headline Posted by Marc Middleton on 09:02:48 AM Jun 15, 2011

- The drop in WWE stock lately has been a major topic of discussion within WWE. Some expect that there will be lots of cost-cutting coming soon but at the same time, WWE will continue their normal work load, even adding more work, just doing it with less employees.

- The tag team of Justin Gabriel and Heath Slater will debut new theme music on this Friday’s SmackDown now that The Corre is no more.

- Randy Orton suffered a legitimate concussion at a WWE live event in Madrid, Spain this past Sunday, which is where WWE got the then-apparent angle on Monday night. They are still working with the idea that Orton will perform at Sunday’s Capitol Punishment pay-per-view.

Huge Change to Capitol Punishment?, Revealing New Diva *LOCKER ROOM* Pics and Lots More!

Partial source: F4Wonline.com

Article source: http://www.twnpnews.com/messages2/34195.php

Chris Jericho captivates on his terms

Posted by Joe Wrestling on June 3, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

(PETERBOROUGH) Chris Jericho has grappled with critics throughout his career, both in the wrestling ring and on stage.

Jericho spent two decades climbing the ranks of pro wrestling, ignoring the skeptics who labeled him too small to become one of the most decorated stars in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) history, including being crowned the first-ever undisputed champion.

Now the lead vocalist of Fozzy, playing the Historic Red Dog tonight (Friday), is defying the disbelievers who first slammed the heavy metal group as simply “the band with the wrestler.”

“There were a lot of people who stayed away from us, thinking it was just a novelty,” says Jericho.

“But I just didn’t wake up one day and say, ‘Let’s start a band.’ This was something I’ve been doing since I was 12. The passion is there, the belief is there and the knowledge is there.

“I think people can sense that. That’s why we are building momentum. Once people can realize it’s real, they’ll get behind you.”

Fozzy’s Peterborough stop is a visit squeezed between two huge concerts in Toronto and Brantford before a major summer tour in Europe alongside metal stalwarts Metallica, Slayer, Slipknot, Anthrax and Motorhead.

“You get a different vibe when you play a smaller club than in bigger places,” says Jericho.

“It’s a little sweatier; more energy and a little more rock and roll. We love that.”

Fozzy Osbourne, a cover band formed in 1999 by Rich Ward of Stuck Mojo, evolved into Fozzy. Jericho joined in 2000, accompanied with characters such as Moongoose McQueen and a satirical storyline. They had inked a 20-year contract to stay in Japan only to discover many famous artists in the U.S. had ripped off their music.

The group’s high-energy sound led to a record deal and two albums of cover songs, Fozzy (2000) and Happenstance (2002), paying tribute to the likes of Ozzy Osbourne, Iron Maiden, Twisted Sister, Motley Crue and Black Sabbath. The second album also included five original songs.

“It was a fun side project and suddenly we got offered a record deal just to play covers. We were kind of confused with that but like any self-respecting musician, we took the money and did it,” quips Jericho.

In 2005, the comical shtick was dropped as was the cover song focus. All That Remains was an album of entirely new music, as was Chasing The Grail, which was released in 2010 to rave reviews and loads of radio time.

“The gimmick can only last so long if the music isn’t there,” says Jericho, who composes the lyrics while Ward writes the music and plays lead guitar alongside guitarist Sean Delson, drummer Frank Fontsere and guitarist Billy Grey.

“We’re a very heavy band but with a lot of melodies.”

But from groove-driven metal compositions, such as Under Blackened Skies and Martyr No More to the epic 14-minute prog-metal tune Wormwood, Jericho finds inspiration from the unlikeliest of bands: The Beatles.

“They are my favourite band of all time. There are a lot of harmonies and melodies in our vocals and much of that comes from listening to them.”

The Winnipeg-raised Jericho (his real name is Chris Irvine, the son of former NHLer Ted Irvine) admits he always chased two childhood dreams.

“Wrestling just kind of took off first before the music did,” he says.

“But now that the music is starting to catch up, it’s very gratifying and rewarding because we’ve been working hard on it.”

Jericho left the WWE in September after his contract expired. It’s his second departure after a two-year hiatus in 2005 during which he said he was disheartened with wrestling. But he remains a busy entertainer. He has written two New York Times best-selling books chronicling his wrestling career and is working on a third book. And there’s been numerous TV appearances include competing on ABC’s Dancing With The Stars.

But wrestling fans are clamouring to know when, or if, Y2J will ever step inside the ring again.

“That’s a big question and I really don’t know.

“When I left in September, I had no plans of coming back and had no plans of not coming back and I still feel the same way. I love them both but right now my main focus is on Fozzy because of all the great stuff we have going on.

“I still like watching wrestling and I keep track of it very diligently and know exactly what’s going on in all aspects of it. I’m still enjoying it as a fan.”

Fans of Jericho share his passion for music and wrestling.

“We have fans from all aspects — your Chris Jericho fans and your die-hard Fozzy fans.

“And there will be the people who will come check out Chris Jericho ‘the wrestler guy’ and see what we’re about.

“I always like to say the only people that don’t like our band are the ones who have never heard it.”

The 100 Greatest Entrance Themes in Wrestling History

Posted by Joe Wrestling on June 1, 2011 under FUW News | Comments are off for this article

Most fans hear this and look at it as iconic. Other fans hear this and say, “Why did Macho Man Randy Savage use the song that I heard at my high school graduation as his entrance music?”

Previous Randy Savage themes include “Hot Stuff” by Donna Summer and “Macho Man” by The Village People. Maybe those would have fit his flamboyant, macho personality better, but he didn’t use them in the WWE. What he used in the WWE stuck with all of the fans.

The song “Pomp and Circumstance” was composed in 1901. It’s also refereed to as March No.1, as it’s a series of marches in which the United States uses the first one.

There are quite a few instruments that are needed to contribute to this piece: two piccolos, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, a bass clarinet, two bassoons, a contrabassoon, four horns, two trumpets, two cornets, three trombones, a tuba, three timpani, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, side drum, jingles, tambourine, two harps, an organ, and strings.

The prestigious sound created by this orchestra has to be the anthem for a prestigious man. No one in the history of professional wrestling has shown more prestige than Macho Man Randy Savage.

Article source: http://bleacherreport.com/articles/677244-the-100-greatest-entrance-themes-in-wrestling-history